Service Dogs

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bluedragon76
April 25, 2020 - 7:49 pm
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bluedragon76
Total Posts: 658
Joined: 10-21-2012
Does anyone else have a service dog? I’m self training my German Shepherd, which is allowed under current ADA law. It’s going slow and steady. Shes a great dog and learns quickly, I just like reinforcing thing in all kinds of different places.


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bluedragon76
bluedragon76
April 25, 2020 - 7:49 pm
Does anyone else have a service dog? I’m self training my German Shepherd, which is allowed under current ADA law. It’s going slow and steady. Shes a great dog and learns quickly, I just like reinforcing thing in all kinds of different places.


janellehale4
April 29, 2020 - 6:25 pm
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janellehale4
Total Posts: 31
Joined: 12-30-2004
I got a note from my social worker saying that my dog was a service dog. But I read the following on the website https://www.akc.org/expert-adv...

It says
"Is A Dog in a Vest a Service Dog?
Although some service dogs may wear vests, special harnesses, collars or tags, the ADA does not require service dogs to wear vests or display identification. Conversely, many dogs that do wear ID vests or tags specifically are not actual service dogs.

For example, emotional support animals (ESAs) are animals that provide comfort just by being with a person. But, because these dogs are not trained to perform a specific job or task for a person with a disability, they do not qualify as service dogs under the ADA.

"The ADA makes a distinction between psychiatric service dogs and emotional support animals. For example, according to the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section, “If the dog has been trained to sense that an anxiety attack is about to happen and take a specific action to help avoid the attack or lessen its impact, that would qualify as a service animal. However, if the dog’s mere presence provides comfort, that would not be considered a service animal under the ADA.”

ESAs are not allowed access to public facilities under the ADA. However, some state and local governments have enacted laws that allow owners to take ESAs into public places. ESA owners are urged to check with their state, county, and city governments for current information on permitted and disallowed public access for ESAs."

I wish I had known that before I took my dog around in public areas. The website has a lot of good information to check out.

I wish you the best with your dog.


Spam? Offensive?
janellehale4
janellehale4
April 29, 2020 - 6:25 pm
I got a note from my social worker saying that my dog was a service dog. But I read the following on the website https://www.akc.org/expert-adv...

It says
"Is A Dog in a Vest a Service Dog?
Although some service dogs may wear vests, special harnesses, collars or tags, the ADA does not require service dogs to wear vests or display identification. Conversely, many dogs that do wear ID vests or tags specifically are not actual service dogs.

For example, emotional support animals (ESAs) are animals that provide comfort just by being with a person. But, because these dogs are not trained to perform a specific job or task for a person with a disability, they do not qualify as service dogs under the ADA.

"The ADA makes a distinction between psychiatric service dogs and emotional support animals. For example, according to the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section, “If the dog has been trained to sense that an anxiety attack is about to happen and take a specific action to help avoid the attack or lessen its impact, that would qualify as a service animal. However, if the dog’s mere presence provides comfort, that would not be considered a service animal under the ADA.”

ESAs are not allowed access to public facilities under the ADA. However, some state and local governments have enacted laws that allow owners to take ESAs into public places. ESA owners are urged to check with their state, county, and city governments for current information on permitted and disallowed public access for ESAs."

I wish I had known that before I took my dog around in public areas. The website has a lot of good information to check out.

I wish you the best with your dog.


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